Examples of Proto-Creek Art

by Richard L. Thornton, Architect & City Planner

These images provide an overview of styles of art found in Pre-Columbian towns that were definitely ancestral to the Creek Indians. More accurate ethnic names would be Apalache or Apalachete, which is what the Creeks called themselves until the mid-18th century. The term, “Muskogee” did not appear until Malachi became High King in the early 1750s.

The Florida Apalachee never called themselves by that name until the Spanish began incorrectly telling them that was their name. The Florida Apalachee were actually Southern Arawaks from Peru. A Peruvian Arawak dictionary will translate most of the Florida Apalachee town and village names.

The indigenous cultures of northwestern Alabama were not ancestral to the Creek Indians. The site plan of Moundville seems to be a supersized version of early proto-Choctaw towns in Mississippi. Dr. Román Piña Chán of the Institutio Nacional de Antropologia E Historia de Mexico identified many artifacts unearthed at Moundville, which were identical or very similar to artifacts unearthed in Tula, the capital of the Toltecs. He hypothesized that after the ransacking of Tula by Chichimec barbarians around 1150 AD, a small band of Toltec priests and commoners established themselves on the Black Warrior River in NW Alabama. A large religious and education complex grew up around their settlement, which we now call Moundville.

Sculpture

Copper artifacts from Etowah Mounds

Grave marker for Eleanor Dare tomb in the Nacoochee Valley (c. 1600 AD)

Artifacts from the Nacoochee Mound

Nacoochee Bobcat
Typical ceramic bowls found in the Nacoochee Valley
Typical ceramic pipes found in the Nacoochee Valley
Thread-spinning whorls from the Nacoochee Valley
Central Mexico style sacrificial knife – found in the Nacoochee Mound
Mesoamerican glyphs found on art from Etowah Mounds

5 Comments

  1. Howdy, Very nice presentation, Would like to have seen you compare the sacrificial knife with those examples of Mayan and Aztec examples I sent you,

    On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM The Americas Revealed wrote:

    > alekmountain posted: ” by Richard L. Thornton, Architect & City Planner > These images provide an overview of styles of art found in Pre-Columbian > towns that were definitely ancestral to the Creek Indians. More accurate > ethnic name would be Apalache or Apalachete, which ” >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The knife was identical to one engraved in stone that I photographed on my fellowship in Mexico. The knife was portrayed on stairway decoration on the Pyramid of Tenayuca in Metropolitan Mexico City. The pyramid dated from around 1000 AD. (pre-Aztec)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Howdy, Found an example of seated figure from Teotiuahcan…very much like those who do not have the Etowah turban. Now, the headless woman legs to her left side…Have seen an example that is (ADENA?) (Hopewell?)

    Liked by 1 person

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