Homo Erectus in the Americas?

by Richard L. Thornton, Architect and City Planner

I photographed this intriguing statue, long ago, while on my fellowship in Mexico. The location was in a remote section of Tabasco State, but I believe that it is now on exhibit at the museum in Villahermosa.

It looked like a primitive hominid, such as Homo Erectus, not a New World Monkey. He is portrayed standing erect with his hands tied behind his neck. This is the typical way that Mesoamerican art portrays prisoners of war or people captured to be made into slaves. Monkeys were always portrayed with their arms and legs tied together, hanging from poles.

Archaeologists don’t like to talk about it, but early French explorers in eastern Tennessee also claimed to have visited a tribe of primitive humans, who were not American Indians, but had lighter skin and bodies completely covered in hair . . . plus had short tails.

This is a typical monkey of Tabasco.

These monkeys walk on all fours and have arched backs and long tails.

4 Comments

  1. Howdy, EASTER ISLAND!!!!!!!! Look at the JAW. NO LEGS.

    On Fri, Apr 15, 2022 at 7:16 AM The Americas Revealed wrote:

    > alekmountain posted: ” by Richard L. Thornton, Architect and City Planner > I photographed this intriguing statue, long ago, while on my fellowship in > Mexico. The location was in a remote section of Tabasco State, but I > believe that it is now on exhibit at the museum in Villa” >

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    1. “… a tribe of primitive humans, who were not American Indians, but had lighter skin and bodies completely covered in hair . . . plus had short tails.” Considering these French explorers in eastern Tennessee may have come across these primitive humans less than 600 years ago, I’d say this was an incredible find in the realm of possibilities. (No wonder modern academia has trouble squeezing it in!)

      Like

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