A Hacienda In Tepotztlan

by Richard L. Thornton, Architect & City Planner

What tourists never see behind the walls of a family compound

One Summer In Mexico – Part 41

Years after my travels in Mexico on a fellowship, a family, who I befriended the first time, invited me to spend the Christmas and New Year holidays at their hacienda on the edge of Tepotzlan, Morelos. The compound was owned by the extended family so the Christmas and New Year celebrations were extraordinary experiences. Those 2 1/2 weeks became a high point of my life. Please join me on a visit back in time.

The outer walls of most haciendas rarely betray the beauty within.
At the gate, one begins to get a hint of the interior.
Typical interior courtyards contain swimming pools and luxuriant vegetation. In addition to ornamental shrubs and trees, this hacienda contained numerous citrus trees.
Tropical flowers were everywhere!
One also saw Christmas ornaments in unusual locations.
I was transported into another world and time.
So were beautiful Mexicanas!
This is what a Mexican Christmas dinner looks like.
A mariachi band entertained us on New Years Eve
Peeking over the wall of the hacienda revealed the other side of Mexico. Indigenous people were washing cloths in a polluted stream. Just beyond another wall of the hacienda was a pagan cemetery. One day we got to watch a pagan funeral, where they made offerings to the gods on top of the grave. Out of respect, I did not photograph the funeral. The region around Tepotzlan is known for the high percentage of Indians, who practice “the ancient religion.”
In between partying, we toured the ancient city of Tepotztlan.
At Christmas the market was filled with vendors.
Back then most of the items were hand made.
One last peek over the wall at sunset before I head back home.

1 Comment

  1. Howdy, Reminded me of seeing women washing clothes in a river as we drove past.

    On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 9:31 AM The Americas Revealed wrote:

    > alekmountain posted: ” by Richard L. Thornton, Architect & City Planner > What tourists never see behind the walls of a family compound One Summer In > Mexico – Part 41 Years after my travels in Mexico on a fellowship, a > family, who I befriended the first time, invite” >

    Liked by 1 person

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