Function of mystery device solved

by Richard L. Thornton, Architect and City Planner

The other evening, I sent out an emergency request for help in identifying the function of a electronic device that had been inserted in the ceiling of my second floor hallway, where there had been a conventional light fixture. The device was not putting out any light, but seemed to be interfering with the sound quality of a CD player in my nearby bedroom. I was hearing a slight “buzzing” sound that hadn’t been there before.

The reason that I bothered you Native American history lovers is that The Americas Revealed gets top billing on the RSS of LinkedIn, where I have several thousand followers . . . including over a thousand Georgia Tech graduates. One of the Tech graduates instantly told me what I needed to do to determine the function of this unwanted intrusion. By the way, it was not an extraterrestrial UFO! LOL

The device, superficially, is a state of the art LED light fixture, but the light was not working. HOWEVER, inside the device is powerful transmitter sending out radio waves at 2400 mhz. My detection device placed the power of the transmitter in the high red level, which means, being close to it constantly would be a health hazard. Actually, it seems to be broadcasting multiple radio waves. There is an Amplitude Modified (AM) channel and a Frequency Modified (FM) channel.

For you technuts out there like me . . . 2400 mhz is the frequency range typically used by WiFi, Bluetooth, baby monitors, the RAM drive on a computer and electronic surveillance devices. In the process of “sweeping” my home, I discovered something else very interesting. There is ultra-sonic waves coming into my computer sound system via the main webpage of YouTube. I don’t think that YouTube’s employees know about this. It goes away when I watch one of the videos in my own YouTube channel. I have no clue what’s the purpose of the ultrasonic intrusion on YouTube, but it can’t be good.

Now you know!

3 Comments

  1. Howdy, GO! GEORGIA! TECH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

    On Wed, Dec 29, 2021 at 10:35 AM The Americas Revealed wrote:

    > alekmountain posted: ” by Richard L. Thornton, Architect and City Planner > The other evening, I sent out an emergency request for help in identifying > the function of a electronic device that had been inserted in the ceiling > of my second floor hallway, where there had been a ” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ultrasonics have been used in advertising and other media for tracking purposes. I know this technology was used in the mid-2000s without much fanfare or acknowledgment for tracking advertising distribution (I had a student who carried around a little receiver that recorded throughout the day when it received ultrasonic signals from radios and television shows around him, and they paid him money to carry it around). The technology has moved into smartphones. Here is an older article about it:
    https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/05/theres-a-spike-in-android-apps-that-covertly-listen-for-inaudible-sounds-in-ads/

    The key search term that’s more popular now is “cross-device tracking”

    Liked by 1 person

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